Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Eugene Debs On War

We are going into a critical election year. The working class of Chicago just flexed their muscles with a massive strike against their neoliberal Democratic mayor. And in Washington the impeachment hearings continue, prompting an aggressive backlash by the Republicans.
As civil war hashtags are trending on social media and Trump is backed into a corner, desperate to find a distraction, let’s remember the wise words of legendary American socialist Eugene Victor Debs at his Canton, Ohio speech against World War One. His birthday was November 5th. War, he said, is a racket, unless it’s the class war:
“That is war in a nutshell. The master class has always declared the wars; the subject class has always fought the battles. The master class has had all to gain and nothing to lose, while the subject class has had nothing to gain and all to lose — especially their lives.
“They have always taught and trained you to believe it to be your patriotic duty to go to war and to have yourselves slaughtered at their command. But in all the history of the world you, the people, have never had a voice in declaring war, and strange as it certainly appears, no war by any nation in any age has ever been declared by the people.
“And here let me emphasize the fact — and it cannot be repeated too often — that the working class who fight all the battles, the working class who make the supreme sacrifices, the working class who freely shed their blood and furnish the corpses, have never yet had a voice in either declaring war or making peace. It is the ruling class that invariably does both. They alone declare war and they alone make peace.
Yours not to reason why;
Yours but to do and die.
That is their motto and we object on the part of the awakening workers of this nation.
“If war is right let it be declared by the people. You who have your lives to lose, you certainly above all others have the right to decide the momentous issue of war or peace.”

Friday, November 1, 2019

Barack Obama has a message about being politically woke

AOC on Endorsing Bernie



Last February I was working as a waitress in downtown Manhattan. I worked shoulder to shoulder with undocumented workers who often worked harder and hardest for the least amount of money.

I didn't have health care. I wasn't being paid a living wage. And I didn't think that I deserved any of those things because that is the script that we tell working people here and all over this country.

It wasn't until I heard of Bernie Sanders that I began to question and assert and recognize my inherent value as a human being that deserves healthcare, housing, education, and a living wage.

Now I am in Congress — and I'm proud to say that the only reason that I had any hope in launching a long shot campaign for Congress is because Bernie Sanders proved that you can run a grassroots campaign and win in an America where we almost thought it was impossible.

Last month, I stood with more than 25,000 people in Queens, New York City, where I endorsed Bernie Sanders for president. And now I am asking you to add your name to say you support Bernie too.

Please add your name to say that you also endorse Bernie Sanders to be our next president, and to build the working class movement that will make that happen.

When I was a baby, my family relied on Planned Parenthood for prenatal care, and back then Bernie Sanders spoke for me.

When I was growing up and education was being gutted for kids in the “wrong” zip code, Bernie Sanders spoke for us.

When I was a waitress and it was time for me to graduate college with student debt, Bernie Sanders was one of the only ones that said no person should be graduating with life-crushing debt at the start of their lives.

Bernie Sanders did not do these things because they were popular — and that’s what we need to remember. He did this, and he fought for these aims and these ends when they came at the highest political cost in America. No one wanted to question this system. And in 2016 he fundamentally changed politics in America.

What we need to do in this country is to organize a positive and welcoming mass movement that is centered on the working class, the poor, and the middle class. One that is actively anti-racist and that is rooted in principles of universality of cooperation.

We need a United States that really, truly and authentically is operated, owned and decided by working people in this country.

Our movement is multi-racial, multi-gendered, multi-generational and multi-geographic. We have to come together not by ignoring our differences, but by listening to them, prioritizing them, and understanding injustice.

The movement that we are building together is one that can not only elect Bernie Sanders, but that can truly transform our country to work for everybody. That is why I am asking you today:

Please add your name to mine and say that you support Bernie Sanders as our next president. Together we can build this movement to transform our country.

Thank you for all you do.

In solidarity, 
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez



Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Homelessness and Jails:


Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Homelessness, and Jails: The Cult of Vengeance

© by Mark Dempsey

The first rule of the Cult of Vengeance is the same as for Fight Club: Don’t talk about Fight Club. Don’t talk about the Cult of Vengeance either, and certainly never admit you’re a member, perhaps not even to yourself.


The Cult of Vengeance is a seldom-discussed part of our civic religion--the beliefs that bind our society together. It declares that people earn their circumstances. So the wealthy are, by the Cult’s lights, virtuous, while the poor and unfortunate have obviously offended some god, or force of nature and deserve their fate. Punishing them is really just giving them what they deserve. Meanwhile, those wealthy enough to be born on third base deserve to act like they hit a triple.


What can I say? It’s a cult, not science.


The Cult is particularly pernicious when public policy supports it. Sue Frost, my County Supervisor, says she agrees that the plight of the homeless is driven by public policies that include persecuting and evicting them from even the modest shelter they devise in our parks. Yet she recently wrote an editorial condemning the ninth circuit court of appeals for invalidating the County’s anti-camping ordinances. The court concluded the homeless qualify as part of the public entitled to use public spaces like parks.


Let’s grant that Ms. Frost has a tough job, providing public spaces for the entire public--even those whose feces and dirty needles are a health hazard. After conceding that public policy produced homelessness, she defended rousting the homeless out of parks, saying she's a good person despite that. She went on to cite her own charity, her belief in a god, and in the kind of merciful treatment that gives people second, third, and even fourth chances to redeem themselves.


But when it comes to public policy, the best she has to offer is criticism for that court decision. The County has never handled homelessness well, and has added 500 new beds for a homeless population that’s roughly 2,000 people larger this year.


Let’s ignore, for the moment, that Supervisor Sue can’t imagine providing porta-potties, or needle exchanges. Let’s even ignore that the Biblical injunction is not to forgive four times, it’s to forgive “seventy times seven” times, essentially treating people where they are, not where we would like them to be. Clearly she follows a different god.


Thursday, October 24, 2019

Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Talk Politics and 2020 with ...

China Town Rising - Oct 24

Film
Against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement of the mid-1960s, a young San Francisco Chinatown resident armed with a 16mm camera and leftover film scraps from a local TV station, turned his lens onto his community. Totaling more than 20,000 feet of film (10 hours), Harry Chuck's exquisite unreleased footage has captured a divided community's struggles for self-determination. Chinatown Rising is a documentary film about the Asian-American Movement from the perspective of the young residents on the front lines of their historic neighborhood in transition. Through publicly challenging the conservative views of their elders, their demonstrations and protests of the 1960s-1980s rattled the once quiet streets during the community’s shift in power. Forty-five years later, in intimate interviews these activists recall their roles and experiences in response to the need for social change.


Tower Theater


Keeping Troops in Syria to Protect Oil Fields - Not lives

President Trump now claims that his “justification” for keeping U.S. troops at the al-Tanf base in southern Syria – where they will be protecting zero Kurdish civilians, who live in northern Syria – is to “protect oil.” This is unconstitutional, because Congress never authorized it. Under Article I of the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution of 1973, the President uses military force in another country after Congress specifically authorizes it.
 
In response to Trump’s announcement, Senator Bernie Sanders said:
 
President Trump announced he will keep troops in Syria to protect oil fields. Last I checked, Congress never authorized U.S. forces to be deployed to secure Syria’s economic resources. Putting U.S. forces in harm’s way for this purpose is illegal and unconstitutional.
 
The Congressional Progressive Caucus said:
 
Congress has never authorized deploying troops in Syria to protect their oil fields. This is dangerous and unconstitutional.
 
The International Crisis Group says the base at al-Tanf “has no obvious military purpose.” The Foreign Policy Research Institute says it’s a “dumb waste of resources.”
 
As we have seen with efforts to end unconstitutional U.S. participation in the Saudi war in Yemen, the first step to stopping Trump from endangering U.S. soldiers at al-Tanf for no reason is to get Members of Congress to say that it’s unconstitutional.  
 
Urge Members of Congress to say that keeping U.S. troops at al-Tanf is unconstitutional by signing our petition.

Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

Erik Sperling and Sarah Burns
Just Foreign Policy

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Chicago Teachers on Strike


Chicago public school teachers and support staff—on strike since October 17 for smaller class sizes and improved services for students—received a boost Tuesday when they were joined on the picket lines by Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren.
The Massachusetts senator joined strikers with the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and SEIU Local 73 outside Oscar DePriest Elementary in the Austin neighborhood on the city’s West Side. “The CTU and SEIU are out on strike for our children. They’re out on strike for working people everywhere,” Warren, who was once a public school teacher herself, told reporters. “I’m here to stand with every one of the people who stand for our children every day.”
Warren’s visit comes as talks between the unions and the city appear to have broken down. On Monday, Mayor Lori Lightfoot wrote an open letter to CTU president Jesse Sharkey, calling on the union to end the strike without a contract as negotiations continue—essentially telling the teachers to surrender their only leverage at the bargaining table.
“We are likely not going to see a quick settlement to the ongoing strike,” Sharkey said at a press conference after receiving the mayor’s letter. “I came in today with raised expectations and hope, but the letter I received today dashed my hope for a quick settlement.”

Monday, October 21, 2019

Kurds to the AMERICAN people


PKK Letter to the American People and President Trump

Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) Foreign Relations Committee
October 18, 2019
ANF News

We are not guilty of terrorism; we are victims of state terrorism. But we are guilty of defending our people”, said the PKK in its letter addressing to the American people and president.



,
Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) Foreign Relations Committee wrote a letter addressing to the American people and President Donald J. Trump responding to the comparisons made between the Kurdish movement and ISIS amid the genocidal campaign of the Turkish state against the Kurdish people.

The letter reads as follows;

“To the American people and President Donald J. Trump,

We refuse comparisons being made between our movement and the inhumane thugs of ISIS. Our response is as follows: There are more than 40 million Kurds living in the Middle East today. At the end of the First World War, outside powers divided them among four autocratic states: Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, where our movement began.

For years, the Kurdish people had asked these governments only for the basic democratic rights that you enjoy each day: the right to exist, to speak their own language, to practice their own culture, to participate in politics as free and equal citizens.


"PKK WAS FOUNDED TO RESIST THE TURKISH STATE VIOLENCE"

Each time, they were brutally subjugated: bombed with advanced weapons, torn from their homes in the middle of the night and disappeared, jailed and tortured, their villages flattened, and their very language and culture banned. Up until we founded the PKK in 1978 to resist the violence of the Turkish state against the Kurdish people, it had already massacred hundreds of thousands of Kurds in the Kurdish regions of Turkey. We don’t have to go too far back in time, in the 90s the Turkish state destroyed 4,000 Kurdish villages and extra-judicially killed 17,000 Kurds.

“OUR EFFORTS WERE IGNORED”

Turkish leaders believed, like so many tyrants throughout history, that they could crush the basic human desire for a free life with violence and terror. They branded us as terrorists and criminals and spent hundreds of millions of dollars to get other countries like the United States of America to do so too, even as their forces committed unspeakable atrocities in violation of all principles of international law. We signed the Geneva Conventions and asked for peace negotiations on various occasions since 1993, knowing that the war could end the second Kurdish rights were institutionalized. These efforts were ignored.


Thursday, October 17, 2019

AOC, Omar, Endorse Sanders



Ocasio-Cortez and Omar endorse Bernie and the political revolution
In a watershed moment in our movement for economic, environmental, racial, and social justice, Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) member Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and fellow congresswoman Ilhan Omar of Minnesota are endorsing Senator Bernie Sanders for president. DSA member Rashida Tlaib of Michigan is expected to endorse as well.
For decades, Bernie has taken on the wealthy and ruling elite with his call for a political revolution. This call has inspired millions. Since his 2016 presidential campaign, we’ve witnessed the skyrocketing growth of DSA, a surge in the popularity of democratic socialism and policies like Medicare for All, a strike wave of teachers and other workers, and the groundbreaking electoral wins of democratic socialist Reps. Ocasio-Cortez and Tlaib and allies like Rep. Omar.
Only a movement made up of millions fighting for a political revolution can beat Trump next November and take on the existential threat of climate change and historic levels of global inequality.
In last night’s Democratic Party primary debate, Elizabeth Warren quipped that she has “no beef with billionaires.” 
We do.
Like Bernie — who argues that billionaires should not exist — we know that billionaires are rich because the vast majority of society is poor. Billionaires profit by denying us the healthcare we need. Billionaires profit from privatization, which has destroyed public schools across the country and poisoned the water in Flint. Billionaires profit from mass incarceration, detention, and endless wars. Billionaires profit from the fossil fuels causing climate catastrophe. To keep getting richer, billionaires invest their money in elections to make sure that politicians of both parties protect their profits.
All of the Democratic candidates, except for Bernie, claim we can fix capitalism. But capitalism is working just as it is meant to: those who have the wealth, who own the companies and reap the profits, have all the power. Meanwhile, those who work in those companies and produce the things that make profit have almost no say over our lives or our political system. But when workers organize and fight back, we can take power and begin to build a world that puts people over profit. We should have control over our own lives — we deserve a democratic socialist world.
Backed by a diverse, energetic working-class movement and by democratic socialist politicians like Tlaib and Ocasio-Cortez, Bernie Sanders can win the Democratic nomination, beat Donald Trump, and, together, we can transform politics in this country and around the world forever.
Sanders’s political revolution has lasting momentum. After the election, Democratic Socialists of America will continue building this movement and fighting with workers for Medicare for All, a Green New Deal, College for All, Housing for All, to abolish ICE, and for an end to mass incarceration at home and imperialism abroad. We are committed to building a fighting, democratic labor movement from the bottom up, and supporting workers on strike, from GM autoworkers to Chicago public school teachers.
Join DSA, and together we can bring to birth a new world from the ashes of the old.
 

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Young Voters Choosing Democratic Socialism

Why Some Young Voters Are Choosing Democratic Socialism Over the Democratic Party
As the presidential debate comes to Ohio, the students in a local chapter of the Young Democratic Socialists of America are defining their political identity.

In Sacramento also

Thursday, October 10, 2019

AB 32 Signed by Governor Newsom !


See post below for information.

Governor: Sign the Bill. AB 32





Signed !!!!!
Currently awaiting Governor Newsom’s signature or veto by an October 13 deadline, Assembly Bill 32 could make California the first state to ban for-profit immigration detention centers and the fifth, following Illinois, Iowa, New York and Nevada, to bar private companies from running for-profit state prisons.
Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Oakland), who authored the bill, argued that private prison firms are accountable to their shareholders, but not to Californians.
“They’re only looking at short-term profit. We’re looking at long-term investment in people,” Bonta said, adding that proportionally, private prisons have more assaults, higher recidivism rates and worse conditions for prison employees than public-sector lockups.
“It’s a no-brainer for me in protecting public health and safety,” Bonta said.
Aseembly Bill 32 passed the assembly on a 65-11 vote, and the senate by 33-6. Seven assembly Republicans and five GOP senators cast yes votes, while Assemblyman James Ramos (D-Highland) crossed party lines to vote no.
More than 60 immigrant and human rights groups, including the California Labor Federation and the Riverside Sheriffs’ Association, support AB 32. Private prison firms the GEO Group and CoreCivic together poured more than $150,000 into lobbying on it but, even though they stand to lose hundreds of millions of dollars if the governor signs the bill, didn’t publicly oppose it.
Call the Governor's Office.  916- 445-2841.  Tell him to sign the bill. 

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

DSA Statement- Close the Camps

antiracismdsa: DSA Statement- Close the Camps: Donald Trump has used divide-and-conquer tactics to divide the working class from the first days of his campaign. And he’s used that pl...

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

How We Can Beat Trump's Racism in 2020

Choosing Democracy: How We Can Beat Trump's Racism in 2020: A road map to neutralizing the role of racism as a divide-and-conquer political weapon Ian Haney López believes that Trump wants 2020 vo...

Trump is not mentally stable

antiracismdsa: Trump is not mentally stable: By  Michael D. Shear  and  Julie Hirschfeld Davis ·         Oct. 1, 2019 · o     WASHINGTON — The Oval Office meeting th...

Thursday, September 26, 2019

The Need for a Progressive Cooperation

Sanders and Warren: The need for a progressive front

As the Democratic primaries unfolds, clear patterns are emerging in the polls. Joe Biden has held on to a steadily diminishing but still significant lead. Bernie Sanders has held a relatively steady proportion of support. Elizabeth Warren has emerged from the pack to be level or sometimes ahead of Sanders, while all other candidates lag behind. While there is much to be said about how to read these early polls, the most important takeaway is that the two candidates with the most progressive visions and campaigns have together surpassed the party’s centrist standard-bearer.

Bhaskar Sunkara, founding editor of Jacobin, wrote an opinion piece in the Guardian this past June arguing that the most important task for progressives during and in the lead up to the Democratic primaries is to build an anti-Biden front. Perhaps anticipating the possibility of a split among progressives between Sanders and Warren supporters, Sunkara noted then that even if Sanders loses, a united anti-Biden front could push the Democratic Party left and improve the odds of defeating Donald Trump. Sunkara had flagged the importance of ousting Trump in an earlier interview: “If push comes to shove and I were in a swing state in 2020, of course, I would vote for anyone in the Democratic field over Trump. I think that’s common sense. It should be hegemonic on the left.”

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Jerry Brown : California Agenda for Climate Change


On Monday, Jerry Brown, the former governor of California, announced that he’s starting an institute at U.C. Berkeley aimed at tackling the climate crisis with help from what he described as a critical ally: China.
The California-China Climate Institute is intended to help spur partnerships between various state agencies and policymakers in China, as well as researchers at Tsinghua University.
The announcement comes amid a global outcry — led in part by young people — over the broad failure to adequately address climate change.
Tensions between the U.S. and China over trade have continued to bubble, and American universities, including U.C. Berkeley, have taken action against Chinese researchers and businesses over security concerns.
I talked with Mr. Brown about how he sees the institute navigating choppy geopolitical waters, and about why he’s throwing his weight behind this effort. Here’s our conversation, lightly edited and condensed for length:
Jill Cowan: To start, can you tell me about how this initiative came about?
Jerry Brown: Several years ago during the time I was governor, it became very clear that California couldn’t be an island of climate action. Our rules to reduce carbon emissions, to require renewable tech and renewable sources for electricity, our policy on low-carbon fuel, the cap-and-trade program — all these rules really need to be part of a more global undertaking.
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I also saw China adopting some of the same programs and so we started sending people to China and welcoming Chinese policymakers, staffers, technicians here in California.
As part of that, I went over and met with President Xi of China, and he met with me soon after President Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement. After I left the governorship, following up on the agreement that I really made in China before, we have forged this new joint institute.
The goal is to keep open the channels of communication with China at the state level but also the national government level, to exchange ideas, bring scientists back and forth between the two countries, push for a more ambitious policy.
I’m wondering how you and others involved with this initiative are approaching working with Chinese institutions, given recent tensions. This is obviously a very open partnership with the Chinese government.

Well, look, there is a policy that is shaping up in Washington to decouple from China. I don’t think that’s the future. To me, that’s 19th-century thinking. It leads to war and economic decline.
So I believe collaboration with our eyes open — not being naïve, not being utopian, but having smart people, scientists, policymakers face the terrible prospect of a heating environment.
People are dying in the fires. People in Florida, Bangladesh, even New York City, in Shanghai they’re going to be facing rising sea level, climate disruption, drought, tropical diseases.
This transcends the age-old rivalry that national governments have. And I am one who believes we have to recognize that we have imperfections. We’re not a white knight.

I start, in one sense, with the doctrine of original sin. We were born with our intellect darkened and our wills weakened. That applies to nations.
China does a lot of stuff that I don’t like, that other people don’t like, but the answer is not to pick up your baseball bat and go home. It’s to engage and to frankly discuss.
I want to focus our best efforts on finding ways to rapidly reduce to a net zero the global emission of heat-trapping gases. To say that borders on the preposterous. But it also is absolutely necessary.
I might even say we’re doing the Lord’s work, and we’re not going to be deterred by other issues and problems and antagonisms, however they may arise.
You’ve mentioned transportation is particularly important to California. Are there ideas that the institute will be looking at that might have the fastest turnaround for implementation?

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Causes of Migration- Honduras

Choosing Democracy: Causes of Migration- Honduras: Ismael Moreno Coto, SJ “Padre Melo”  will discuss the root causes of mass  migration from Central America, focusing on th...



Ismael Moreno Coto, SJ   “Padre Melo”

will discuss the root causes of mass migration from Central America, focusing on the ongoing human rights crisis in Honduras.





Sponsored by  Sacramento Solidarity with Honduras Coalition

St. Francis of Assisi ,Pathways for Justice
St. Ignatius Parish

Unitarian Universalist SS
Sacramento Area Congregations Together

Racine Dominican Sisters


Date and Time: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 at 7:00 PM

Location: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral
2620 Capitol Ave, Sacramento, CA
Enter on 27th Street for Free Parking

Cultural Presentation TBA, Reception to follow

International Human Rights Award Winner

Director of Radio Progreso and ERIC-SJ
(center for reflection, research, and communications) in Honduras

Free Will Offering







Saturday, September 14, 2019

Beto O'Rourke on gun reform: 'We're going to take away your AR-15, your ...

Trump's Campaign to Divide

George Goehl

Trump’s Reelection Strategy: Pit Us Against Each Other

You would think after a white nationalist murdered 22 people and injured dozens more in El Paso, Donald Trump would lay off the hate, even just for a moment. Apparently he’s not capable. Or not willing. Whether it’s immigration raids, cutbacks on legal immigration, or attacking women of color in Congress, Trump is doubling down on division. Clearly the Trump campaign is planning to stir up new levels of anti-immigrant sentiment as a path to re-election. This strategy takes advantage of the fact that many Americans are experiencing economic decline. In large parts of the country, gone is the sense that our children will do better than we did. Instead, people are asking: “Who’s fighting for us?” It’s a valid question. For the last 40 years, leading Democrats have failed to directly name who was responsible for that decline — big corporations hijacking our government, rigging the system, and creating the biggest gap between the rich and everyone else in American history. That vacuum has left space for other side to blame immigration for the end of good jobs with solid benefits and health care. Sadly, that sets off a race to the bottom that benefits the most abusive corporations — and hurts the rest of us. Instead of taking the bait, we should come toward each other. If we unite to take on the real cause of economic decline — a corporate class intent on becoming ridiculously rich at the expense of the rest of us — we have the power to create the change we so desperately need. Then we can begin to bring back good jobs, expand affordable and quality health care, protect our air and water, and so much more.